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Baby pictures

August 19, 2009

No, not that kind—this kind!

These are all our new trees. I realized I haven’t been doing a good job documenting the garden progress this summer, so I snapped a bunch of these just so we’ll have a record of them as they (hopefully!) get bigger.

Acacia tree

Acacia tree---can't remember the variety anymore, but D. picked it out at the UC Botanical Garden's plant sale last year. It's supposed to get quite big and fill this space in a lovely evergreen-with-yellow-flowers way without (supposedly) being too aggressive. Acacia honey is also supposed to be especially tasty, if we ever get around to getting bees.

Multi-grafted pluot

Multi-grafted pluot yearling: Dapple Dandy, Flavor Queen, and Flavor Supreme. This guy has looked healthier, but he did grow an insane amount this year, almost doubling in size. Yikes! We do need to do some aggressive pruning to balance out the tiniest graft, though, which didn't bear fruit at all this year.

Sour cherry

Montmorency sour cherry---the fencing is supposed to discourage the Labradane from trampling this one when he chases critters at night.

Grapefruit

Oroblanco grapefruit. All the citrus are a bit yellow this time of year; hopefully a little more to drink and a splash of iron sulfate will fix this soon.

Multi-grafted cherry

Multi-grafted cherry: Van, Bing, Lapins, and Rainier on Mazzard rootstock, so this one should get pretty big too. This went in where we pulled out a decrepit fig earlier this summer.

Avocado

Hass avocado (note all the new leaves, which are a very big deal after the last two avocados didn't make it!)

Tangerine tree

Page mandarin

Lime tree

Bearss lime (with passionflowers behind)

Lemon tree

Meyer lemon

Not pictured: The second Meyer lemon tree; the feijoa tree, which we’re pretty sure is now growing exclusively from below the graft, and will probably be replacing as a result; and our Charlie Brown Christmas tree, which is actually looking quite respectable these days and is growing happily in a shady corner of the yard, where it’s supposed to get to be 25 feet tall or so and provide some nice screening. We’ll see!

We’re pretty close to being maxed out on space for trees in the yard at this point. I have a few spaces targeted for large evergreen screen trees—one for a weeping bottlebrush tree, I think, and the other possibly for a type B avocado, plus the “Jervis Bay After Dark” peppermint tree D. picked out that’s visible behind the multi-grafted cherry, which we’ll plant as soon as the ground is diggable again. But that’s about it for the rear yard. Since D. wants a pear and I still want a fall-bearing apple (our Gala tree ripens in early July, which throws me for a loop, since I grew up in New England, where October is apple season!), I’m thinking of pulling out some of the nandina in the side yard and planting one or both there. (Originally I wanted a Mutsu apple, but since they apparently don’t do too well in the mild Bay Area, I’m now leaning towards an heirloom Gravenstein, which ripens in late August or early September here. They’re unusual in that they need a cross-pollinator, but I think the Gala tree should do the trick.) We can also potentially put some espaliered trees along our rear fence, but then we’re pretty much done on the tree front. On to currants, more blueberries, elderberries, and other bushes this winter!

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5 comments

  1. Okay Artemis, dunno what kind of Acacia it is either, but next time you want one, please let me know! They spread like crazy, and grow very fast! We have been cutting our down and taking the branches to the Oakland Zoo for the animals! Good to know about the honey, though. We’ll have to try some!

    Also, did you plant your avocado in pairs? I heard you need a type A and a Type B in order to get fruit. We lost one of ours this year. I think I need to work on my soil quality!


  2. Yes, we’d heard the same thing about acacias—this particular variety comes with the blessing of the folks at the UC Botanical Garden, though, so fingers crossed that they are right about it not being too invasive! I should probably dig up the name and get some second opinions, though, since it’s still young enough to dig up quite easily.

    We originally planted a pair of avocadoes, but both of those trees died; when we planted this Hass, the original Fuerte tree was still alive so it had a match. After its death we decided to wait and see if this one was going to make it before investing in a new Type B tree. What I’ve heard is that you can get single trees to fruit around here even without a second tree, but you get many, many more avocadoes if you have a tree of the other type to cross-pollinate. So we will probably put in another Fuerte (or convince our next-door neighbor to!) if it seems this one is going to survive (which is looking much more promising these days!)


  3. HELLO EVERYBODY! WE HAD SUCH TREES WHEN WE LIVED IN SOUTH RUSSIA WHERE THE CLIMATE WAS MEDITTERANEAN. I LOVE THIS FRUIT!!! NOW I LIVE IN GREECE AND THIS FRUIT IS UNKNOWN HERE, SO I WANT TO BUY SOME LAND TO GROW FEIJOA TREES, BUT I DON’T KNOW HOW AND WHERE I CAN FIND TREES OR SEEDS TO PLANT. ANYONE WHO KNOWS ANYTHING I WOULD BE GREATFULL. THANK YOU VERY MUCH!


  4. I bet the the weakest pluot graft was flavor king and is dead by now, seems to happen on almost all the multi-graft pluot trees I have seen. How do you enjoy the pluots though? Dapple Dandy produces well in my area and tastes delicious.


  5. I think you’re right, Tobias, though I’d have to go look at the grafts to be sure–but I know that Dapple Dandy is definitely the major producer. The weak graft is still hanging in there, but has yet to produce fruit (and at this point is massively overpowered by the other two varieties–this little tree is huge now!) In fact, all of these trees (at least the ones that are still with us) are huge now–if I ever jumpstart this blog, I need to do a five-year update on them…



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